⋅ English 9 (Honors, College Prep, Traditional)
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English 9 (Honors, College Prep, Traditional) - Parent/Community Course Guide

Adopted by Board of School Directors on April 2021
Grade Levels
: 09 |


Course Description
:


All levels of English 9 emphasize the three modes of writing (informative, argumentative, and narrative). English 9 instructors help students improve writing by reading and analyzing author’s craft in both fiction and nonfiction literary works.  English 9 is aligned to the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards and the Keystone Composition Exam anchors.

 

English 9 focuses on organizing the three modes of writing--persuasive, informative, and narrative--and on understanding how grammatical instruction can improve both the conventions and style of writing. This course includes literature-based units that enhance thinking skills through intentional interaction between reader and text.  Additionally, the course includes vocabulary development as it relates to literature and writing.

English 9 College Prep is a course designed for students who intend to continue their education beyond high school. This course will aid students in improving their writing by focusing on organizing the three modes of writing--persuasive, informative, and narrative--and on understanding how grammatical instruction can improve both the conventions and style of writing. This course includes literature-based units that enhance thinking skills through intentional interaction between reader and text.  Additionally, the course includes vocabulary development as it relates to literature and writing.

English 9 Honors will consistently challenge students to perform at rigorous academic levels and to expand their knowledge and skills to the next level -- a level beyond the traditional curriculum. Honors English 9 will demand both high quantity and quality of effective writing for a range of audiences and purposes. Extensive out of class reading is required; therefore, students interested in this course should have a genuine love of reading. Through the coursework, students will be expected to meet and exceed state standards for reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Summer reading and an accompanying project is required.  Students considered for Honors English 9 should have scored at the advanced level on 8th grade ELA PSSA exam and demonstrated a solid work ethic as determined by teacher recommendation.



Core Curriculum Content Standards
:


PA Core

PA Common Core: English Language Arts (2013)
Reading Literature: Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.
GRADES 9-10
  • Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. (1.3.9-10.A)
  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author’s explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject. (1.3.9-10.C)
  • Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect. (1.3.9-10.E)
  • Analyze how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts. (1.3.9-10.F)
  • Read and comprehend literary fiction on grade level, reading independently and proficiently. (1.3.9-10.K)
  • Writing: Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.
    GRADES 9-10
  • Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately. (1.4.9-10.A)
  • Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience. (1.4.9-10.B)
  • Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (1.4.9-10.C)
  • Organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text; include formatting when useful to aiding comprehension; provide a concluding statement or section. (1.4.9-10.D)
  • Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and spelling. (1.4.9-10.E)
  • Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.-Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.-Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.-Establish and maintain a formal style. (1.4.9-10.F)
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics. (1.4.9-10.G)
  • Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.-Introduce the precise claim. (1.4.9-10.H)
  • Distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims; develop claim(s) fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns. (1.4.9-10.I)
  • Create organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence; Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims; provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (1.4.9-10.J)
  • Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.-Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.-Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.-Establish and maintain a formal style. (1.4.9-10.K)
  • Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and spelling. (1.4.9-10.L)
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events. (1.4.9-10.M)
  • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple points of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters. (1.4.9-10.N)
  • Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, description, reflection, multiple plot lines, and pacing, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters; use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, settings, and/or characters. (1.4.9-10.O)
  • Create a smooth progression of experiences or events using a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (1.4.9-10.P)
  • Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of writing.-Use parallel structure.-Use various types of phrases and clauses to convey meaning and add variety and interest. (1.4.9-10.Q)
  • Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and spelling. (1.4.9-10.R)


  • Keystone Anchors

    Keystone Composition (2012)
    Composition - Exposition
    Writing to Inform-Exposition
    Write informative pieces that describe, explain, or summarize information or ideas.
  • Write with a sharp controlling point and an awareness of the audience and expository task. (C.E.1.1.1)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose with relevant information, content, and details. (C.E.1.1.2)
  • Use appropriate organizational strategies for expository writing (e.g., compare/contrast, cause/effect, problem/solution, process analysis (C.E.1.1.3)
  • Use precise language, stylistic techniques, and a variety of sentence structures to develop and maintain an appropriate, objective tone. (C.E.1.1.4)
  • Write with control of grammar, mechanics, spelling, usage, and sentence formation. (C.E.1.1.5)
  • Revision-Exposition
    Revise writing to improve style, meaning, word choice, and sentence variety.
  • Use a variety of sentence structures. (C.E.2.1.1)
  • Use precise language to create clarity, voice, and tone. (C.E.2.1.2)
  • Revise to eliminate wordiness and redundancy. (C.E.2.1.3)
  • Revise to delete irrelevant details. (C.E.2.1.4)
  • Use the correct form of commonly confused words; use logical transitions. (C.E.2.1.5)
  • Combine sentences for cohesiveness and unity. (C.E.2.1.6)
  • Revise sentences for clarity. (C.E.2.1.7)
  • Editing for Conventions-Exposition
    Use conventions of standard written language.
  • Spell all words correctly. (C.E.3.1.1)
  • Use capital letters correctly. (C.E.3.1.2)
  • Punctuate correctly (e.g., use commas, semicolons, quotation marks, and apostrophes correctly). (C.E.3.1.3)
  • Demonstrate correct grammar and usage (e.g., verb and pronoun form and agreement, modifiers and transitions, word order and syntax). (C.E.3.1.4)
  • Demonstrate correct sentence formation. (C.E.3.1.5)
  • Composition - Persuasion
    Writing to Persuade—Persuasion
    Write persuasive pieces that include a clearly stated position made convincing through the use of appropriate methods.
  • Write with a sharp, distinct controlling point that clearly states a position and demonstrates awareness of task, purpose, and audience. (C.P.1.1.1)
  • Construct a thorough argument with consistent, relevant support through the use of persuasive strategies; address opposing viewpoints. (C.P.1.1.2)
  • Organize the argument using effective strategies to develop a strong, well-supported position. (C.P.1.1.3)
  • Maintain an effective and consistent tone through precise control of language and a variety of sentence structures. (C.P.1.1.4)
  • Write with control of grammar, mechanics, spelling, usage, and sentence formation. (C.P.1.1.5)
  • Revision-Persuasion
    Revise writing to improve style, meaning, word choice, and sentence variety.
  • Use a variety of sentence structures. (C.P.2.1.1)
  • Use precise language to create clarity, voice, and tone. (C.P.2.1.2)
  • Revise to eliminate wordiness and redundancy. (C.P.2.1.3)
  • Revise to delete irrelevant details. (C.P.2.1.4)
  • Use the correct form of commonly confused words; use logical transitions. (C.P.2.1.5)
  • Combine sentences for cohesiveness and unity. (C.P.2.1.6)
  • Revise sentences for clarity (C.P.2.1.7)
  • Editing for Conventions-Persuasion
    Use conventions of standard written language.
  • Spell all words correctly. (C.P.3.1.1)
  • Use capital letters correctly. (C.P.3.1.2)
  • Punctuate correctly (e.g., use commas, semicolons, quotation marks, and apostrophes correctly). (C.P.3.1.3)
  • Demonstrate correct grammar and usage (e.g., verb and pronoun form and agreement, modifiers and transitions, word order and syntax). (C.P.3.1.4)
  • Demonstrate correct sentence formation. (C.P.3.1.5)


  • Units
    :


    Unit #1 - Narrative Writing
    Unit #2 - Informational Writing
    Unit #3 - Short Fiction/ Literary Devices
    Unit #4 - English Grammar and Writing Conventions
    Unit #5 - Persuasive/Argumentative Writing
    Unit #6 - Long Fiction - Required
    Unit #7 - Long Fiction: Choice
    Unit #8 - Literary Non-Fiction
    Unit #9 - Drama
    Unit #10 - Poetry / Literary Devices
    Unit #11 - Vocabulary Study
    Unit #12 - Research


    Course Resources
    :


    9th Grade Texts
    Trouble by Gary D. Schmidt
    Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
    Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
    Farewell to Manzanar
    by James D. Houston and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
    The Merchant of Venice
     by William Shakespeare
    Julias Caesar by William Shakespeare
    Antigone by Sophocles
    Night by Elie Wiesel
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    All-American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 
    The Miracle Worker 
    by William Gibson
    A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck


    Optional Media
    To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
    King of the Hill (1993)
    One Survivor Remembers (1995)
    The Miracle Worker (2000 edition)
    Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2006)
    Auschwitz Death Camp: Oprah (2006)
    The Hunger Games (2012)

    Optional Poetry
    "The Funeral" by Gordon Parks 
    "The Courage that My Mother Had" by Edna St. Vincent Millay
    "Hector the Collector" by Shel Silverstein
    "Block City" by Robert Louis Stevenson
    "The Wayfarer" by Stephen Crane
    "Fire and Ice" by Robert Frost
    "There Will Come Soft Rains" by Sara Teasdale
    "Fueled" by Marie Hans
    "The Rainy Day" by Longfellow
    "There is a Last Solitary Coach" by David Vogel
    "I, The Survivor" Bertolt Brecht
    "First They Came" by Martin Niemoller
    "The Butterfly" by Pavel Friedman
    "Shema" by Primo Levi
    "Without Tomorrow" by Unknown Author
    selections from Holocaust Poetry by Hilda Schiff

    Selected Short Stories 
    Selections from Patterns in Literature and Literature and Language
    "The Necklace"
    "The Stolen Party"
    "The Way Up"
    "The Most Dangerous Game"
    "Initiation"
    "The Scarlet Ibis"
    "Red Dress"
    "The Smuggler"
    "Split Cherry Tree"
    "Grover Dill and the Tasmanian Devil"
    "Sweet Potato Pie"
    "Open Window"
    "The Amigo Brothers"
    "The Gift of the Magi"
    "A Day's Wait"
    "The Fifty-first Dragon"
    "The Scholarship Jacket"
    "Button Button"
    "Everybody Knows Tobie"